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Smithsonian

Posts tagged with ‘Snapshot’

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Babe Ruth and Other Red Sox Pitchers, 1915
Baseball season is here. This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot celebrates the 100th anniversary of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, with this 1915 photograph of Babe Ruth and other Red Sox pitchers: George “Rube” Foster, Carl Mays, Ernie Shore and Hubert “Dutch” Leonard.
On April 20, 1912, the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox opened to the public in Boston. The Red Sox beat the New York Highlanders, renamed the New York Yankees in 1913, 7-6 in 11 innings. Newspaper coverage of the opening was overshadowed by continuing coverage of the Titanic sinking days earlier April 14, 1912.
In 1914, the Red Sox acquired George Herman Ruth Jr., best known as “Babe” Ruth, as their all-star pitcher. This 1915 photo shows Ruth with the pitching staff that helped propel the Red Sox to a World Series Championship the same year. This photo marks Ruth’s second season in the major leagues.
In six seasons as a pitcher, the 24-year-old Ruth compiled an 89-46 won-lost record, with a 2.28 ERA and three World Series victories. Had he continued to pitch he would have ranked among baseball’s greatest pitchers.
This is a rare photograph of Ruth in the beginning of his career; it helps the Smithsonian fully describe the impact of this legendary baseball player.
To view more sports-related items at the Smithsonian, visit the National Museum of American History’s sports and leisure collection.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not on display. To learn more about this item, visit the National Portrait Gallery’s website.
Babe Ruth and Other Red Sox Pitchers, 1915
Baseball season is here. This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot celebrates the 100th anniversary of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, with this 1915 photograph of Babe Ruth and other Red Sox pitchers: George “Rube” Foster, Carl Mays, Ernie Shore and Hubert “Dutch” Leonard.
On April 20, 1912, the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox opened to the public in Boston. The Red Sox beat the New York Highlanders, renamed the New York Yankees in 1913, 7-6 in 11 innings. Newspaper coverage of the opening was overshadowed by continuing coverage of the Titanic sinking days earlier April 14, 1912.
In 1914, the Red Sox acquired George Herman Ruth Jr., best known as “Babe” Ruth, as their all-star pitcher. This 1915 photo shows Ruth with the pitching staff that helped propel the Red Sox to a World Series Championship the same year. This photo marks Ruth’s second season in the major leagues.
In six seasons as a pitcher, the 24-year-old Ruth compiled an 89-46 won-lost record, with a 2.28 ERA and three World Series victories. Had he continued to pitch he would have ranked among baseball’s greatest pitchers.
This is a rare photograph of Ruth in the beginning of his career; it helps the Smithsonian fully describe the impact of this legendary baseball player.
To view more sports-related items at the Smithsonian, visit the National Museum of American History’s sports and leisure collection.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not on display. To learn more about this item, visit the National Portrait Gallery’s website.

Babe Ruth and Other Red Sox Pitchers, 1915

Baseball season is here. This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot celebrates the 100th anniversary of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, with this 1915 photograph of Babe Ruth and other Red Sox pitchers: George “Rube” Foster, Carl Mays, Ernie Shore and Hubert “Dutch” Leonard.

On April 20, 1912, the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox opened to the public in Boston. The Red Sox beat the New York Highlanders, renamed the New York Yankees in 1913, 7-6 in 11 innings. Newspaper coverage of the opening was overshadowed by continuing coverage of the Titanic sinking days earlier April 14, 1912.

In 1914, the Red Sox acquired George Herman Ruth Jr., best known as “Babe” Ruth, as their all-star pitcher. This 1915 photo shows Ruth with the pitching staff that helped propel the Red Sox to a World Series Championship the same year. This photo marks Ruth’s second season in the major leagues.

In six seasons as a pitcher, the 24-year-old Ruth compiled an 89-46 won-lost record, with a 2.28 ERA and three World Series victories. Had he continued to pitch he would have ranked among baseball’s greatest pitchers.

This is a rare photograph of Ruth in the beginning of his career; it helps the Smithsonian fully describe the impact of this legendary baseball player.

To view more sports-related items at the Smithsonian, visit the National Museum of American History’s sports and leisure collection.

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not on display. To learn more about this item, visit the National Portrait Gallery’s website.

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Shortsnout Scorpionfish X-Ray, 1908
Smithsonian scientists use X-ray images like this one to gather important information about the internal biology of a fish without dissecting or in any other way altering the specimen.
This X-ray shows a Shortsnout Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis obtuse). It has venomous glands in the spines of the fins, which can deliver a powerful, numbing toxin. This specimen was collected in the Philippines in 1908, but it was not named as a new species until 2001.
The Smithsonian’s National Collection of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind. The collection comprises an estimated 4 million individual fish specimens representing more than 70 percent of the world’s fish species. These specimens serve as a historical record of fish biodiversity and a working reference library for scientists around the world.
This photo is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is currently on display in the “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out” exhibition at the National Museum of Natural History.
All X-rays and fish photographs were taken by Sandra J. Raredon, museum specialist in the Division of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History.
For more info on “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out,” visit the exhibition website.
To learn more about each of the fish species featured, visit the Encyclopedia of Life.
Shortsnout Scorpionfish X-Ray, 1908
Smithsonian scientists use X-ray images like this one to gather important information about the internal biology of a fish without dissecting or in any other way altering the specimen.
This X-ray shows a Shortsnout Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis obtuse). It has venomous glands in the spines of the fins, which can deliver a powerful, numbing toxin. This specimen was collected in the Philippines in 1908, but it was not named as a new species until 2001.
The Smithsonian’s National Collection of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind. The collection comprises an estimated 4 million individual fish specimens representing more than 70 percent of the world’s fish species. These specimens serve as a historical record of fish biodiversity and a working reference library for scientists around the world.
This photo is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is currently on display in the “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out” exhibition at the National Museum of Natural History.
All X-rays and fish photographs were taken by Sandra J. Raredon, museum specialist in the Division of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History.
For more info on “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out,” visit the exhibition website.
To learn more about each of the fish species featured, visit the Encyclopedia of Life.

Shortsnout Scorpionfish X-Ray, 1908

Smithsonian scientists use X-ray images like this one to gather important information about the internal biology of a fish without dissecting or in any other way altering the specimen.

This X-ray shows a Shortsnout Scorpionfish (Scorpaenopsis obtuse). It has venomous glands in the spines of the fins, which can deliver a powerful, numbing toxin. This specimen was collected in the Philippines in 1908, but it was not named as a new species until 2001.

The Smithsonian’s National Collection of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind. The collection comprises an estimated 4 million individual fish specimens representing more than 70 percent of the world’s fish species. These specimens serve as a historical record of fish biodiversity and a working reference library for scientists around the world.

This photo is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is currently on display in the “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out” exhibition at the National Museum of Natural History.

All X-rays and fish photographs were taken by Sandra J. Raredon, museum specialist in the Division of Fishes at the National Museum of Natural History.

For more info on “X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside Out,” visit the exhibition website.

To learn more about each of the fish species featured, visit the Encyclopedia of Life.

(Source: )

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Alexander Graham Bell’s Large Box Telephone, 1876
On March 7, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell, scientist, inventor and innovator, received the first patent for an “apparatus for transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically,” a device he called the telephone.
On March 10, 1876, three days after his patent was issued, Bell and his assistant, Thomas Watson, made the first successfully transmitted message. Pressing the receiver against his ear, Watson heard Bell’s message: “Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you.”
This is one of two telephones used by Bell in a demonstration between Boston and Salem, Mass., Nov. 26, 1876. It features an iron diaphragm, two electromagnets and a horseshoe permanent magnet. Unlike other so-called “box telephones” in the Smithsonian collection, it does not have a wooden cover.
The Smithsonian collected this telephone primarily for its role in the Boston to Salem demonstration; it was acquired in 1923 from American Telephone & Telegraph Co. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has a collection of almost 1,000 objects that are used to explore the origin and development of telephone technology. This box telephone, as part of that collection, helps experts understand and present the history of telephony.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It will be on display in “American Stories,” a long-term exhibition beginning April 5 at the National Museum of American History.
For more info, visit the National Museum of American History’s website. To view photos, sculptures and portraits of Alexander Graham Bell, visit the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery website.
Alexander Graham Bell’s Large Box Telephone, 1876
On March 7, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell, scientist, inventor and innovator, received the first patent for an “apparatus for transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically,” a device he called the telephone.
On March 10, 1876, three days after his patent was issued, Bell and his assistant, Thomas Watson, made the first successfully transmitted message. Pressing the receiver against his ear, Watson heard Bell’s message: “Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you.”
This is one of two telephones used by Bell in a demonstration between Boston and Salem, Mass., Nov. 26, 1876. It features an iron diaphragm, two electromagnets and a horseshoe permanent magnet. Unlike other so-called “box telephones” in the Smithsonian collection, it does not have a wooden cover.
The Smithsonian collected this telephone primarily for its role in the Boston to Salem demonstration; it was acquired in 1923 from American Telephone & Telegraph Co. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has a collection of almost 1,000 objects that are used to explore the origin and development of telephone technology. This box telephone, as part of that collection, helps experts understand and present the history of telephony.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It will be on display in “American Stories,” a long-term exhibition beginning April 5 at the National Museum of American History.
For more info, visit the National Museum of American History’s website. To view photos, sculptures and portraits of Alexander Graham Bell, visit the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery website.

Alexander Graham Bell’s Large Box Telephone, 1876

On March 7, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell, scientist, inventor and innovator, received the first patent for an “apparatus for transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically,” a device he called the telephone.

On March 10, 1876, three days after his patent was issued, Bell and his assistant, Thomas Watson, made the first successfully transmitted message. Pressing the receiver against his ear, Watson heard Bell’s message: “Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you.”

This is one of two telephones used by Bell in a demonstration between Boston and Salem, Mass., Nov. 26, 1876. It features an iron diaphragm, two electromagnets and a horseshoe permanent magnet. Unlike other so-called “box telephones” in the Smithsonian collection, it does not have a wooden cover.

The Smithsonian collected this telephone primarily for its role in the Boston to Salem demonstration; it was acquired in 1923 from American Telephone & Telegraph Co. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has a collection of almost 1,000 objects that are used to explore the origin and development of telephone technology. This box telephone, as part of that collection, helps experts understand and present the history of telephony.

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It will be on display in “American Stories,” a long-term exhibition beginning April 5 at the National Museum of American History.

For more info, visit the National Museum of American History’s website. To view photos, sculptures and portraits of Alexander Graham Bell, visit the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery website.

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Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Vega 5B, 1932
On May 20 - 21, 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman—and the second person after Charles Lindbergh—to fly nonstop and solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
Flying this red Lockheed Vega 5B, she left Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, Canada, and landed about 15 hours later near Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The flight made Earhart an instant worldwide sensation and proved she was a courageous and able pilot.
Later that summer, Earhart flew the Vega setting another record. On August 24 - 25, 1932, she made the first solo, nonstop flight by a woman across the U.S., from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J. The flight covered a distance of 2,447 miles and lasted about 19 hours.
In June 1933, Earhart sold this Vega to Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute where it remained until transferred to the Smithsonian in 1966. In 1976, the sleek Vega was installed in the new National Air and Space Museum to recognize Earhart’s flights. The innovative combination of an internally braced wing and strong shell fuselage made the design a popular record-setting, private and commercial aircraft.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is on display in the Barron Hilton Pioneers of Flight gallery at the National Air and Space Museum.
For more info, visit the National Air and Space Museum’s website.
To learn more about Earhart’s first transatlantic flight and the mail she transported, visit the National Postal Museum’s website. For more Women’s History Month events and resources, visit the Smithsonian’s Education website.
Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Vega 5B, 1932
On May 20 - 21, 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman—and the second person after Charles Lindbergh—to fly nonstop and solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
Flying this red Lockheed Vega 5B, she left Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, Canada, and landed about 15 hours later near Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The flight made Earhart an instant worldwide sensation and proved she was a courageous and able pilot.
Later that summer, Earhart flew the Vega setting another record. On August 24 - 25, 1932, she made the first solo, nonstop flight by a woman across the U.S., from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J. The flight covered a distance of 2,447 miles and lasted about 19 hours.
In June 1933, Earhart sold this Vega to Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute where it remained until transferred to the Smithsonian in 1966. In 1976, the sleek Vega was installed in the new National Air and Space Museum to recognize Earhart’s flights. The innovative combination of an internally braced wing and strong shell fuselage made the design a popular record-setting, private and commercial aircraft.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is on display in the Barron Hilton Pioneers of Flight gallery at the National Air and Space Museum.
For more info, visit the National Air and Space Museum’s website.
To learn more about Earhart’s first transatlantic flight and the mail she transported, visit the National Postal Museum’s website. For more Women’s History Month events and resources, visit the Smithsonian’s Education website.

Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Vega 5B, 1932

On May 20 - 21, 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman—and the second person after Charles Lindbergh—to fly nonstop and solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

Flying this red Lockheed Vega 5B, she left Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, Canada, and landed about 15 hours later near Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The flight made Earhart an instant worldwide sensation and proved she was a courageous and able pilot.

Later that summer, Earhart flew the Vega setting another record. On August 24 - 25, 1932, she made the first solo, nonstop flight by a woman across the U.S., from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J. The flight covered a distance of 2,447 miles and lasted about 19 hours.

In June 1933, Earhart sold this Vega to Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute where it remained until transferred to the Smithsonian in 1966. In 1976, the sleek Vega was installed in the new National Air and Space Museum to recognize Earhart’s flights. The innovative combination of an internally braced wing and strong shell fuselage made the design a popular record-setting, private and commercial aircraft.

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is on display in the Barron Hilton Pioneers of Flight gallery at the National Air and Space Museum.

For more info, visit the National Air and Space Museum’s website.

To learn more about Earhart’s first transatlantic flight and the mail she transported, visit the National Postal Museum’s website. For more Women’s History Month events and resources, visit the Smithsonian’s Education website.

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Levi Strauss Jeans, 1875–96
In the late 1800s, San Francisco merchant Levi Strauss and tailor Jacob Davis began manufacturing worker’s trousers reinforced by copper rivets—the world’s first jeans. The jeans in this photo are one of the oldest known pairs. 
Davis, a fabric customer of Strauss, had complaints from his customers that their pants were ripping apart. In response, Davis developed a way to make the pants even stronger by placing metal rivets at the “points of strain.” In 1873, Davis brought his design to Strauss and the partners received the patent for rivets on men’s pants. They began selling copper-riveted “waist overalls.”
This pair is made of brown duck, a heavy cotton fabric, and it features the familiar riveted pockets, button fly and waistband patch of modern jeans. The first jeans came in two styles—indigo blue and brown duck.
Initially worn by miners and cowboys, jeans evolved into casual clothing for all ages, classes and lifestyles. In the 1890s, the company created its first pair of Levis 501 Original Fit Jeans, a style that went on to become the world’s best-selling item of clothing.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not currently on display.
Levi Strauss Jeans, 1875–96
In the late 1800s, San Francisco merchant Levi Strauss and tailor Jacob Davis began manufacturing worker’s trousers reinforced by copper rivets—the world’s first jeans. The jeans in this photo are one of the oldest known pairs. 
Davis, a fabric customer of Strauss, had complaints from his customers that their pants were ripping apart. In response, Davis developed a way to make the pants even stronger by placing metal rivets at the “points of strain.” In 1873, Davis brought his design to Strauss and the partners received the patent for rivets on men’s pants. They began selling copper-riveted “waist overalls.”
This pair is made of brown duck, a heavy cotton fabric, and it features the familiar riveted pockets, button fly and waistband patch of modern jeans. The first jeans came in two styles—indigo blue and brown duck.
Initially worn by miners and cowboys, jeans evolved into casual clothing for all ages, classes and lifestyles. In the 1890s, the company created its first pair of Levis 501 Original Fit Jeans, a style that went on to become the world’s best-selling item of clothing.
This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not currently on display.

Levi Strauss Jeans, 1875–96

In the late 1800s, San Francisco merchant Levi Strauss and tailor Jacob Davis began manufacturing worker’s trousers reinforced by copper rivets—the world’s first jeans. The jeans in this photo are one of the oldest known pairs. 

Davis, a fabric customer of Strauss, had complaints from his customers that their pants were ripping apart. In response, Davis developed a way to make the pants even stronger by placing metal rivets at the “points of strain.” In 1873, Davis brought his design to Strauss and the partners received the patent for rivets on men’s pants. They began selling copper-riveted “waist overalls.”

This pair is made of brown duck, a heavy cotton fabric, and it features the familiar riveted pockets, button fly and waistband patch of modern jeans. The first jeans came in two styles—indigo blue and brown duck.

Initially worn by miners and cowboys, jeans evolved into casual clothing for all ages, classes and lifestyles. In the 1890s, the company created its first pair of Levis 501 Original Fit Jeans, a style that went on to become the world’s best-selling item of clothing.

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is not currently on display.

(Source: newsdesk.si.edu)