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Posts tagged with ‘Science’

funnywildlife:

A type of catlike creature called a genet has been spotted catching a ride on the backs of buffalo and white rhinos, new camera trap pictures reveal by Simon Morgan Wildlife Act.

Hey, Smithsonian scientist! What’s up with this crazy rhino riding cat? 

"Maybe it’s safer riding a rhino." 

—Adam Ferguson, small carnivore expert, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. 

More Q & A with Adam on this “never before seen behavior” on Smithsonian Science

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The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 
The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction.

The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report

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5 Fun Facts about the Naked Mole-Rat:
1. Naked mole-rats can live up to 30 years.
2. A colony contains up to 300 naked mole-rats!
3. They have a social system like bees – the queen is the only female reproducing in the colony.
4. She can have 900+ pups in a lifetime!
5. Because the queen’s milk has high water content, she needs to produce 58% of her body weight in milk daily to feed her pups.
Learn more with experts from Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Smithsonian Environmental Research Center via Smithsonian Science. 
5 Fun Facts about the Naked Mole-Rat:
1. Naked mole-rats can live up to 30 years.
2. A colony contains up to 300 naked mole-rats!
3. They have a social system like bees – the queen is the only female reproducing in the colony.
4. She can have 900+ pups in a lifetime!
5. Because the queen’s milk has high water content, she needs to produce 58% of her body weight in milk daily to feed her pups.
Learn more with experts from Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Smithsonian Environmental Research Center via Smithsonian Science. 

5 Fun Facts about the Naked Mole-Rat:

1. Naked mole-rats can live up to 30 years.

2. A colony contains up to 300 naked mole-rats!

3. They have a social system like bees – the queen is the only female reproducing in the colony.

4. She can have 900+ pups in a lifetime!

5. Because the queen’s milk has high water content, she needs to produce 58% of her body weight in milk daily to feed her pups.

Learn more with experts from Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Smithsonian Environmental Research Center via Smithsonian Science