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Wow, this product sounds too good to be true! It probably is—and products have been marketed with false claims for a long time. But wait! There’s more:
Electropathic Belt ads claimed it would treat a variety of ailments, including “nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, rheumatism, indigestion, sleeplessness, [and] ladies’ ailments.” At the time, electricity was mysterious and seemingly wonderful. Despite the welcoming, calm looks of the two “invalids” in this ad, the belt didn’t work as advertised. Instead, it proved extremely effective in chafing skin—and nothing else.
More examples of bogus ads from history from our National Museum of American History. First 50 readers get free admission to any of our museums (Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum not included in this offer)****You guys know that all our museums (excluding Cooper-Hewitt) have free admission, right?
Wow, this product sounds too good to be true! It probably is—and products have been marketed with false claims for a long time. But wait! There’s more:
Electropathic Belt ads claimed it would treat a variety of ailments, including “nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, rheumatism, indigestion, sleeplessness, [and] ladies’ ailments.” At the time, electricity was mysterious and seemingly wonderful. Despite the welcoming, calm looks of the two “invalids” in this ad, the belt didn’t work as advertised. Instead, it proved extremely effective in chafing skin—and nothing else.
More examples of bogus ads from history from our National Museum of American History. First 50 readers get free admission to any of our museums (Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum not included in this offer)****You guys know that all our museums (excluding Cooper-Hewitt) have free admission, right?

Wow, this product sounds too good to be true! It probably is—and products have been marketed with false claims for a long time. But wait! There’s more:

Electropathic Belt ads claimed it would treat a variety of ailments, including “nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, rheumatism, indigestion, sleeplessness, [and] ladies’ ailments.” At the time, electricity was mysterious and seemingly wonderful. Despite the welcoming, calm looks of the two “invalids” in this ad, the belt didn’t work as advertised. Instead, it proved extremely effective in chafing skin—and nothing else.

More examples of bogus ads from history from our National Museum of American History. First 50 readers get free admission to any of our museums (Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum not included in this offer)**

**You guys know that all our museums (excluding Cooper-Hewitt) have free admission, right?

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Do you miss watching Saturday morning cartoons? Smithsonian Institution’s Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) opens their “What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones” exhibit at the Museum of Moving Image in New York City this Saturday, July 19. Learn more about the exhibit and Jones’ legacy on the exhibit’s website. 
Do you miss watching Saturday morning cartoons? Smithsonian Institution’s Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) opens their “What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones” exhibit at the Museum of Moving Image in New York City this Saturday, July 19. Learn more about the exhibit and Jones’ legacy on the exhibit’s website. 

Do you miss watching Saturday morning cartoons? Smithsonian Institution’s Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) opens their “What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones” exhibit at the Museum of Moving Image in New York City this Saturday, July 19. Learn more about the exhibit and Jones’ legacy on the exhibit’s website

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Happy birthday, Rubik’s Cube! The mind-bending toy, known to stump most who try it, turns 40 today. The original prototype above was initially designed to be a learning tool for Rubik’s architecture students, but the well-known colorful toy has reached curious challengers worldwide. Learn more about the Cube on the Bright Ideas blog from Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Happy birthday, Rubik’s Cube! The mind-bending toy, known to stump most who try it, turns 40 today. The original prototype above was initially designed to be a learning tool for Rubik’s architecture students, but the well-known colorful toy has reached curious challengers worldwide. Learn more about the Cube on the Bright Ideas blog from Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.

Happy birthday, Rubik’s Cube! The mind-bending toy, known to stump most who try it, turns 40 today. The original prototype above was initially designed to be a learning tool for Rubik’s architecture students, but the well-known colorful toy has reached curious challengers worldwide. Learn more about the Cube on the Bright Ideas blog from Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.

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This may look like an ordinary brown jar to you, but it is possibly the most written about jar in history. This famous tea jar even has a name: Chigusa. In 16th C Japan, tea connoisseurs wrote copiously about its beauty—its shape, glaze and color—and designed elaborate accessories with which to adorn it. To the tea men, this jar was the equivalent of what Benedict Cumberbatch is to the Tumblr community. 
You can see it on view at our freersackler until July 27. More about Chigusa and the #ArtofTea
This may look like an ordinary brown jar to you, but it is possibly the most written about jar in history. This famous tea jar even has a name: Chigusa. In 16th C Japan, tea connoisseurs wrote copiously about its beauty—its shape, glaze and color—and designed elaborate accessories with which to adorn it. To the tea men, this jar was the equivalent of what Benedict Cumberbatch is to the Tumblr community. 
You can see it on view at our freersackler until July 27. More about Chigusa and the #ArtofTea

This may look like an ordinary brown jar to you, but it is possibly the most written about jar in history. This famous tea jar even has a name: Chigusa. In 16th C Japan, tea connoisseurs wrote copiously about its beauty—its shape, glaze and color—and designed elaborate accessories with which to adorn it. To the tea men, this jar was the equivalent of what Benedict Cumberbatch is to the Tumblr community. 

You can see it on view at our freersackler until July 27. More about Chigusa and the #ArtofTea

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smithsonianlibraries:

Sloth Facts:
Though they spend most of their lives in trees, sloths are in fact good swimmers.
Sloths are the number one on the list of illegally traded pets from Colombia.
There are six species of sloths, belong in two families: Megalonychidae (two-toed sloth) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloth). 
While they have a reputation for sleeping 16 hours a day, that seems to only happen in captivity. In the wild, they average just under 10 hours.
Sloth hair might treat cancer and yield other medical benefits.
Sloths are rad. Hopefully you enjoyed our coverage of sloth week. And a hearty welcome to all the new followers!
Image from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, via their awesome Flickr site.The book is Locupletissimi rerum laturalium thesauri accurata descriptio… (translated as “Accurate description of the very rich thesaurus of the principal and rarest natural objects”) published 1734-65 by Albertus Seba. It was contributed by the Missouri Botanical Garden.
smithsonianlibraries:

Sloth Facts:
Though they spend most of their lives in trees, sloths are in fact good swimmers.
Sloths are the number one on the list of illegally traded pets from Colombia.
There are six species of sloths, belong in two families: Megalonychidae (two-toed sloth) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloth). 
While they have a reputation for sleeping 16 hours a day, that seems to only happen in captivity. In the wild, they average just under 10 hours.
Sloth hair might treat cancer and yield other medical benefits.
Sloths are rad. Hopefully you enjoyed our coverage of sloth week. And a hearty welcome to all the new followers!
Image from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, via their awesome Flickr site.The book is Locupletissimi rerum laturalium thesauri accurata descriptio… (translated as “Accurate description of the very rich thesaurus of the principal and rarest natural objects”) published 1734-65 by Albertus Seba. It was contributed by the Missouri Botanical Garden.

smithsonianlibraries:

Sloth Facts:

  • Though they spend most of their lives in trees, sloths are in fact good swimmers.
  • Sloths are the number one on the list of illegally traded pets from Colombia.
  • There are six species of sloths, belong in two families: Megalonychidae (two-toed sloth) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloth). 
  • While they have a reputation for sleeping 16 hours a day, that seems to only happen in captivity. In the wild, they average just under 10 hours.
  • Sloth hair might treat cancer and yield other medical benefits.

Sloths are rad. Hopefully you enjoyed our coverage of sloth week. And a hearty welcome to all the new followers!

Image from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, via their awesome Flickr site.
The book is Locupletissimi rerum laturalium thesauri accurata descriptio… (translated as “Accurate description of the very rich thesaurus of the principal and rarest natural objects”) published 1734-65 by Albertus Seba. It was contributed by the Missouri Botanical Garden.

smithsonian3d:

We are thrilled to announce our involvement in a history-making event. Yesterday at the whitehouse Maker Faire, we unveiled two 3-D printed portraits of President Obama. This is the first time a U.S. President has been scanned in 3-D and the prints and the data from the scan will become part of the collection the National Portrait Gallery. We had the honor of scanning him with our structured light scanners and with some of the most advanced 3-D technology including University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies, Light-stage that was used to capture his face at high resolution. Our partners at Autodesk combined the two sets of scanned data into one model and 3D Systems created the 3D print using SLS nylon. We hope to share more details about the process soon, but for now you can read the press release 

Congratulations to our history-making team! The first ever presidential portrait made using 3-D technology.