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It’s no wonder why he’s been called the “American ‘Lawrence of Arabia.’”

In the early 1950s, archaeologist Wendell Phillips and his team set out to uncover the ancient cities of Timna, the capital of the kingdom of Qataban, and Hajar bin Humeid in present-day Yemen. A new exhibition at Smithsonian’s Freer and Sackler Galleries, "Unearthing Arabia: The Archaeological Adventures of Wendell Phillips," displays objects, photos and lively stories from the expedition. Learn more about Phillips’ expeditions and the exhibit here. Photos courtesy of freersackler

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Time travel through deep time with smithsonianmag's Earth Interactive. You’ll see how Earth has changed over seven major period’s in its climate history and what it may look like in the future. Humans are irrevocably changing our world, driving ecological change so profound that many scientists are referring to today as a new geologic age: The Anthropocene. Or, the Age of Humans. 
Tomorrow we’re hosting a symposium where invited guests and our experts in climate change, natural history and world culture will explore the effects we’re having on our planet and what solutions we’ll need in order to adapt. You can watch the live webcast and follow along on social media at #AgeofHumans
Time travel through deep time with smithsonianmag's Earth Interactive. You’ll see how Earth has changed over seven major period’s in its climate history and what it may look like in the future. Humans are irrevocably changing our world, driving ecological change so profound that many scientists are referring to today as a new geologic age: The Anthropocene. Or, the Age of Humans. 
Tomorrow we’re hosting a symposium where invited guests and our experts in climate change, natural history and world culture will explore the effects we’re having on our planet and what solutions we’ll need in order to adapt. You can watch the live webcast and follow along on social media at #AgeofHumans

Time travel through deep time with smithsonianmag's Earth Interactive. You’ll see how Earth has changed over seven major period’s in its climate history and what it may look like in the future. Humans are irrevocably changing our world, driving ecological change so profound that many scientists are referring to today as a new geologic age: The Anthropocene. Or, the Age of Humans. 

Tomorrow we’re hosting a symposium where invited guests and our experts in climate change, natural history and world culture will explore the effects we’re having on our planet and what solutions we’ll need in order to adapt. You can watch the live webcast and follow along on social media at #AgeofHumans

funnywildlife:

A type of catlike creature called a genet has been spotted catching a ride on the backs of buffalo and white rhinos, new camera trap pictures reveal by Simon Morgan Wildlife Act.

Hey, Smithsonian scientist! What’s up with this crazy rhino riding cat? 

"Maybe it’s safer riding a rhino." 

—Adam Ferguson, small carnivore expert, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. 

More Q & A with Adam on this “never before seen behavior” on Smithsonian Science

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“I thought your cover picture was really marvelous,” Kennedy wrote the artist after the work appeared on Time, “but I don’t have red spots all over my face.”

Roy Lichtenstein, famous for his comic book-style pop art, created very few portraits. Our National Portrait Gallery writes about this rare commission from Time Magazine and the process the artist used to create it.
(via National Portrait Gallery | Face to Face blog: Time Magazine: RFK by Roy Lichtenstein)

“I thought your cover picture was really marvelous,” Kennedy wrote the artist after the work appeared on Time, “but I don’t have red spots all over my face.”

Roy Lichtenstein, famous for his comic book-style pop art, created very few portraits. Our National Portrait Gallery writes about this rare commission from Time Magazine and the process the artist used to create it.
(via National Portrait Gallery | Face to Face blog: Time Magazine: RFK by Roy Lichtenstein)

“I thought your cover picture was really marvelous,” Kennedy wrote the artist after the work appeared on Time, “but I don’t have red spots all over my face.”

Roy Lichtenstein, famous for his comic book-style pop art, created very few portraits. Our National Portrait Gallery writes about this rare commission from Time Magazine and the process the artist used to create it.

(via National Portrait Gallery | Face to Face blog: Time Magazine: RFK by Roy Lichtenstein)

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 

Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here.

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The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 
The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction.

The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report

Silvia Ros Press photograph, National March for Equality in Washington, DC, 2009 Scripts and press materials from NBC’s Will & Grace program. Max Mutchnick & David Kohan, show creators, intentionally presented LGBT characters who were not stereotyped, caricatured, or demeaned. Passports for David Heubner, U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa, and his husband Duane McWaine. Travel, both domestic and international, is an on-going justice and legal issue for LGBT couples Transgender flag designed by Monica Helms (right), and friends. The stripes represent traditional pink & blue associated w/ girls and boys and white for intersex, transitioning, or of undefined gender

Yesterday, our National Museum of American History added more items to its LGBTQ History collection. The items are not on view yet, but you can see many of them online now

LGBTQ History is an important part of the American experience and the Smithsonian is committed to making sure these stories are told. In a blog post, a curator reflects on collecting and interpreting LGBTQ material culture.

One year ago today, scientist from our Museum of Natural History announced the discovery of a new mammal species—the olinguito. Looking like a cross between a cat and a teddy bear, it was destined to become a media sensation. In fact, its widespread publicity has helped scientists learn even more about this species in the past year. Citizen scientists have sent in photos of the elusive animal that lives in the cloud forests of the Andes Mountains, helping scientists understand where it lives, what it eats and how it lives. 

Learn more on Smithsonian Science